can I skip the fruit acid for a henna gloss?

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MayaN
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can I skip the fruit acid for a henna gloss?

So after a LOT of experimenting with henna recipes, I finally now have a lovely (and nearly EVEN) copper auburn color,  from my gray roots to my ends,  even though my hair was previously dyed.   I use only Mehandi products.  I now use Twilight Henna/Amla on my mostly gray roots, mixed with distilled water and some aloe vera juice.   That gives me copper penny auburn results on my roots, once it oxidizes.  That's my goal color.  I do not put on the rest of my hair when I do my root touch ups.    

I'm confused about how to proceed with henna glossing, to freshen up my lengths, which are in fairly good condition but a bit porous due to previous chemical processing.  The reason they need freshening up?   Well, after hennaing them copper earlier this year, I then had an unexpected (and totally unwanted) DARK result a couple months later, when trying a henndigo gloss, even though a low percentage of indigo was used.  Over time I successfully removed I'd say 95% of the brunette/indigo (yes it can be done!) using natural honey lightening menthods, and oils.  So now my lengths are pretty much copper penny auburn again, but not as vibrant as the roots... they look a tad browner, and also more faded. 

I think a henna gloss is the right fix, but not sure I want to use even a mildly acidic liquid for it, because I am very concerned that if I do, the copper red result will turn too dark  over time, (even if I use Jasmine) , and then be a pain in the butt to try to safely lighten, just like the indigo was a pain to lighten.  Why am I so concerned about that?  Because I am growing my hair long, and the info on this website says that the color result from a mildly acidic mix will "continue to darken for years," which I did not know, and that is definitely not what I want.  I want the copper red to stay the same or fade... I don't mind doing more frequent root touch ups or all-over glosses to deal with fading, that's an easy fix compared to results that wind up too dark.

I know that Mehandi offers fruit acids that keep henna bright over time and counteract darkening, but I tried two of them and they did not work well for me, for two reasons.  One, they made my hair too cherryish (cool red) in tone, instead of copper (warm red).  Two, a "brightening" acid doesn't work on my grayest areas, makes the henna come up too vivid.   That's why I add aloe vera juice to my recipe, it provides antioxidants without affecting the color result.  But I'm not sure how much that will prevent darkening of henna over the years. 

So these are my questions: 

~ Is it ok to use LESS than 25 gm Amla per 100 gm henna on the gray roots?  I'm thinking that maybe more like 10gm might make the mix less acidic (and therefore less likely to darken over time?)  yet still help mute the vivid orange of the henna just a bit, on my grays. 

~ Will Twilight henna likely "take" to grays, even if I decide to mix it with just chamomile tea and no Amla at all?  I don't care if it fades in time, I'm just curious if it'll ititially "stick."  I don't wanna bother with a 5 hour patch test unless it's known to sometimes stick to grays with out being in a more acidic base. 

~ For my all-over henna gloss, if I just mix it with chamomile tea, no fruit juice or fruit acid,  will that mean that it will be less likely to darken up over the years, meaning more likely to remain copper red or fade? 

Thanks so much!  Maya

Update: Decided to justgo ahead and try a low-acid Twilight henna application on the lengths, full strength instead of a gloss, and processing for only 1.5 hrs.  I mixed the henna with equal parts melissa balm tea (made with distilled water) and organic aloe vera juice.  It came out awesome, it brought the lengths up to almost the exact tone as my roots!  It might fade, I realize, but for now the color is  vibrant copper penny auburn, and I don't mind reapplying if it fades.  

I would still like to know if I can use less than 25 gm. of amla in my root recipe though, per 100 gm. twilight, if I want to be able to get the orange-muting benefits of amla while creating a less acidic mix that will be less likely to darken over time.  Thanks!   Maya

enissel
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Less Darkening

Hello,

25g of Amla is the amount per 100g you want to use to mute the brassy tones. Using less than 25g will make the paste less acidic and will not mute the brassy tones.

MayaN
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Last seen: 1 week 2 days ago
Joined: 2017-04-16 04:10
thanks

ok, thanks!  I am wondering if there is anything that can be added to a Twilight Henna/Amla recipe that can prevent the color from progressively going darker or browner over the years.  I wouldn't want to add anything that would counteract the slightly browning effect of the Amla, because I need that effect on my mostly gray roots.  I just want them to stay copper after they initially oxidize and grow out, not keep getting darker.  I am already adding some aloe vera juice to the mix, to bump up the antioxidant content.  Already avoiding hot styling tools on my hair too.  If you have any other ideas, let me know, and thank you again!  

enissel
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Last seen: 2 days 14 hours ago
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Joined: 2016-09-07 09:47
Darkening

Hello,

You can try adding a small amount of Cassia to your mix. The cassia will make a lighter result to being with, so the color will not oxidize as deeply.

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