Questionsnive always wanted to ask

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Lehana
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Questionsnive always wanted to ask
Instead of clogging up the forums with multiple posts I thought I'd ask a bunch of questions in one post. The big W, I've seen information for using henna on scars and warnings not to use henna on a open cut or wound. As most henna seems concentrated on hands and feet is there a specific rule when it comes to warts. If you use disposable equipment and are careful not to risk spreading the virus is it safe to henna over a wart? I have a cousin who had them when she was younger and the chance to hide them or create beautiful desings over them would have been a real self esteem boost. Question 2: a good friends mother is going through an epic cancer battle. She is very self conscious about her bald head but now that summer is here she can't stand to wear beanies and hats. Wigs irritate the skin and can be super itchy. I immediately thought of henna since it is cooling, is a sun block and could help her feel more feminine about her head. I read Alma powder also helps encourage hair growth so would it be beneficial to add it to the body art mix? Three: every art has it's own etiquette Using designs from sites and photos is ok when just practicing on yourself or the family member you roped into being a gunea pig. (like when I was at school we had to copy the painting start night by vangoh to really learn what it was all about) It is ok to copy the basics like using an open heart to create flower petals as this seems tonbe everywhere not a single persons design The same goes for zodiac signs like the curly m is Virgo Butnif your setting up a stall it must all be completely your own work from scratch Please let me know if I have misinterpreted anything.
Blurberrybuzz
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

thought I'd take a stab at it.

W = no idea

Cancer/bald heads = henna away. 

using photos or other's work for inspiration or to copy = give proper credit and read the copyright section in the Henna Page Encyclopedia.  Most of us are inspired by other's work, whether it's henna, textiles, paintings, etc.  It's best to note the original artist.  By all means, if you want to use someone's work as an example, ask.  There are a lot of fabulous e-books and copyright free materials out there to use.  Most of the e-books are made to be used.  I have designs from several e-books, copyright free designs and my own original work in my festival and party books.

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

I think Blur covered it all really, I did want to add that if your friend's mother is currently having cancer treatment I would recommend sticking with a straight henna paste, and would even suggest not adding any oil including lavender. Reason I mention it, is there is ongoing research as to lavender's affect on the body and more importantly hormones namely estrogen. Depending on the type of cancer she is battling if there is any chance that lavender does raise estrogen in the body and the cancer is a hormonal reactive (usually breast, ovarian and cervical) it could cause some real issues. For me when it comes to cancer I never mess around even if it's a very slight risk.

As for the warts, I too aren't sure I would think if you're able to keep your cone above the skin and not touching the wart you should be perfectly fine. If you want to use the same cone on someone else you could always wipe the tip off with an alcohol swab before starting the next person.

I always try to credit the original artist if I am using their full design or a vast amount (eg Kim Brennan's roses) but small elements are pretty freely used, the zodiac signs have been around for ages so I am not sure we even know who came up with them ;)

Lori B.
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Can I add a question about giving credit where it's due? How exactly do you give credit where the design is on a person? Is the name of the artist incorporated into the design somehow? When a customer walks away and someone else sees their tattoo how do they know who came up with that design?

Blurberrybuzz
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Just give credit in any photograhs or drawings. 

for example, I've noted whose original design and what book it came from in the description of this photo

http://www.flickr.com/photos/blurberrybuzz/3556374063/in/set-72157624615...

Mani
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Regarding warts:  You should check with a physician if you have concerns about using henna over a wart, but in my personal experience, I have never had any negative effects.  Warts are caused by a viral infection.  If you use tea tree oil as a terp in your henna, it could actually be benificial to the wart sufferer as it has anti-viral and anti-fungal properties.  Henna is also cooling, soothing, and has anti-inflammitory effects that I should think would help with warts.  The effected skin will probably stain darker than the surrounding skin, so plan your design accordingly.

Malynda
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Most often, the problem with using other peoples' designs comes when someone takes another's work and claims it is their own creation... usually by posting pictures taken from another artist's book or website, removing the copyright info (if applied) and attaching their name to it or otherwise implying that they performed the work shown. 

You can use others' work as inspiration for your own freehand art and if you take a picture of work fully or largely based on others' designs, just cite source.

Lehana
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask
Yay than for all the great answers. It's been really cloudy and muggy here so I haven't mixed any henna up because I think it needs sunshine so I am making a carrot cake and using a carrot bag to ice 'mmmmmmmmm' I'll post a picture :D Oh I miss the days working on a station where it hit forty degrees centigrade every day then I would have some wicked dark paste.
Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Sure am happy I don't wait for sunshine up here in Canada LOL if it's cool out just tuck your henna someplace warm like on your computer tower, on top of the fridge or even right over your furnace vents. I've also found that holding the henna'ed area (usually hand) over a lit charcoal (you know those little ones for incense) with some sandalwood on it and keeping your skin close enough to feel heat and in the smoke seems to give a beautiful darker stain. Some use steam before removing the paste the next day too.

Lehana
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask
Ooooooo those are very clever ideas I was going ton wrap it in a blanket with a rice pack or water bottle but computer is a good idea or even the tv lol. Once I left it in the car since they can get so hot when your not using them and all the windows are up. *does a dance* now I can go make henna whoop hoooo!
Malynda
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

You don't want your henna getting above 85F unless you are prepared to watch it like a hawk.  Higher temperatures makes the dye release faster and makes the dye demise faster (your paste loses potency quicker).  If it gets hot and stays hot for too long, your paste will be ruined.  A nice, steady temp of around 70-80F is what you are after.

Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

I just let mine sit at room temperature, although it's can be as cold as -50 outside, I keep it at 21 indoors, so no need for keeping it in a "warmer" location.  I've heard if it gets too hot it will cook and be unusable.  So unless you keep your house below room temperature, you should be fine!

Lehana
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask
Minus fifty! Wow Nicole you must live at the north pole! Or maybe I am converting backwards
Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Hahaha, nope not the North Pole...just Winnipeg :)  50 below in the winter, 50 above in the summer (once you factor in wind chill and humidity :)).  We have very extreme temperatures.  Next to my down-filled parka is a pair of slush pants, and under those, a pair of Birkenstocks...because the weather can change in a minute!

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

LOL Nicole, I hear ya I am in SW Ontario. We don't get as cold as you do (you really do have my sympathy) but boy those seasonal changes really do throw ya! I am forever having to readjust my sugar content for that reason.

Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Yeah, I'm having "fun" playing with that now, and the thing is it changes so frequently, (especially when transitioning seasons) that what worked for you this morning, might not work in the afternoon.

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Too true! I am hoping my mix that I made last week will work on Saturday for a birthday party I have, it might rain so...argh! 1 pack of Sweet 'n Low better not be too much *fingers crossed*

Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Right...you almost need two batches in the freezer, one for humid days, one for dry days...maybe another for in between days :)

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

LOL I've seriously considered that option and during the seasonal changes I consider it more and more seriously.

Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Well if you have time to lemon-sugar everyone as soon as it dries, it's not really a problem...a lesson I learned last weekend when everyone's Eid henna was flaking off, but mine (which I did at home) rstayed on all night... that stuff keep any henna on forever (from my experience).

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

I tend to tape my own or at jobs where I have 1 or 2 people. If it's a large crowd and I don't have a helper it can suck! I need a helper monkey or something!! Yes the lemon juice and sugar does make it stay though, maybe I should do a quick speech before birthday parties or something and let everyone know they need to spray it hmmm...gonna think about that one!

Lehana
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask
Spray on bandage works a treat but smells like a nail polish factory. Helper monkey is a good idea. I'd help someone out for free if it meant I got to watch and learn.
Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

I guess the problem with spray is that you have to know how much to put on, I wouldn't want people doing it themselves, because I could see them oversoaking and making it run.  I know it took me a few times to get it right.

I've tried hair gel as well, but in my experience lemon sugar is better because it's natural, and it's ingredients that are already in your henna paste, so you know there aren't any allergies or reactions by the time you spray it on.  Also, I would guess it's probably cheaper, and the ingredients are always on hand.  Just don't burn it!  :)  The lemon - sugar also re-moistens the paste, which I think gives you a better stain, and if you get some on you clothes it's not problem to wash out.  If you get it on food or a table you eat on, there's no problem either.  (Also, it's very delicious, I had my friend's sister spraying herself where there was no henna to lick it off!  :P)

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

I usually suggest no more then two pumps of the bottle per design (well festival/party designs you know the quick stuff). I used spray bandage on...well I can't remember but it hurt like hell, so I decided to use it on henna and O_M_G I couldn't get the stuff off! I find if your skin is on the dry side the spray bandage sticks far too well. I agree L/S is much cheaper and no chemicals (other then what leaches out of the bottle). I have a birthday party tomorrow so I might give the quick speech a go and see what I can do with the spray. I'd surely have a helper, if I could find one around my area to help me!

Nicole
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Give one of the kiddos and "extra special" design to help you.

Last weekend I had kids trying so hard to babysit my son just to get some free henna.  Too bad for them the offer was already made to my niece :)

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

LOL I'll definately have to remember that one! Turns out it was only 8 girls who took awhile between designs to figure out what they wanted.

Desdemonas Designs
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

I don't use any after spray EVER at festivals, I put enough sugar in my paste so that people can leave my booth and be on their way and not worry about waiting for drying, or coming back and interrupting my line to get sprayed.  Its WAY too much hassle, and it costs me money to slow down and spray people (and usually by that time they want me to FIX something too!) instead of hennaing my next customer :)

I've also found it more likely for people to have a sensitivity to the lemon sugar than the spray hair gel.  I myself have developed a sensitivity to topical citrus and can't use lemon juice in my paste anymore! (And I know of at least one other forum member who is the same way), so be careful of thinking that just because something is natural, that its harmless. 

Anymore, I usually only use sprays for private parties where its a small group of people who have been sitting around patiently, and at the end I give them all a spritz, but for things like baby bellies, bald heads, important hands, I use medical paper tape.

Deborah Brommer

Maggie
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Re: Questionsnive always wanted to ask

Well festivals is where having at least one "booth babe" is highly beneficial. I never once have to stop because my husband takes care of spraying, questions and money. I've yet to have a problem with spray, nor have I had any trouble with getting people to come back to my booth. It's just far too humid here in SW Ontario in the summer to put more sugar in my paste, I'd easily end up with runny mud. For private appointments I go with Mefix, for parties and festivals I go with spray. I think as we start into our businesses we each learn what works best for us, alot of it is trial and error but we get there. We all know that what works for other members on the desert isn't going to work for someone on the Great Lakes.

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