Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

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jmk3482
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Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

I found this and at first was excited to see all the wonderful pictures of an operating Sudan salon. But as I watched the slide show and listened to the commenary, I became sad and confused. I would very much like CCJ to watch this and give me your insight on the dark colors and the information presented.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8608387.stm

CCartwrightJones
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Re: Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

I've watched that slide show several times, and the use of PPD in Sudanese (and other) henna will be addressed in the dissertation as part of limitations and delimintations, and disambiguation.

Though it is possible to make beautiful stains with henna on extremely dark skin, the techniques take time and the very best henna.  Because market forces are what they are, cutting time and expense is always going to happen, no matter what business is transacted, and sometimes these cuts are hazardous.  Fashion is going to happen, and sometimes fashion is hazardous. 

There's a fundamental difference between PPD black henna in a closely connected community and PPD black henna in an open-ended clientele.  In an interconnected community the inevitable injuries will surface, be recognized, and become self-limiting, because of self-regulation of local government regulation.  That's probably a five to ten year cycle, depending on how people respond to the damage, and at what point the local health department takes action.  In an open-ended clientele (such as tourists coming into an area, getting their PPD, and going home) there is no cycle of recognition and self-limiting of the injuries.  In the interconnected communities in the Arabian Penninsula, there is now legislation and policing of parlors slinging deathpaste.  New beachfront seasonal deathpaste slingers set up every year because they're not getting that "look what you did to me you $%^&*" crucial feedback, or at least they're not getting it often enough. Also, in the open-ended clientele, the potential customers don't have that "my cousin got blistered, maybe I shouldn't do this" experience.

Yes, Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, Egypt, Morocco, Mauritania, Tunisia, Zanzibar and ... list goes on .... use PPD instead of, or in addition to henna.  Within their own groups, I feel fairly sure they'll eventually negotiate it among themselves as "this is a really bad idea, we're getting hurt".  Also, they'll deal with it through their own legal and health care systems.

For the dissertation, I'm focusing on the tourist sector where people arrive with expectations, and leave before the injuries appear, and the discussion of the damage done happens a long ways from the person who caused the damage, so the  problem just keeps going, and going, and going, and going. 

 

 

CCartwrightJones
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Re: Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

BTW, phydicians and nurses in Sudan, Nigeria, and Arab countries have contacted me a few times when they've seen the injuries come in, and asked me how to mitigate the situation. 

The options are limited:

Temptu and things like that are just too expensive and difficult to import and substitute.

Education is slow, and fashion urgency usually eclipses good sense. 

The good terps are hard to get and people will stubstitute things like gasoline, lighter fluid and benzene ...

As long as people don't recognize the harm, or don't think they'll get caught, there will be injuries until there's enforcement. Different cultures are willing to put up with different levels of harm tied to the pleasure of their choice, and every place has to negotiate that separately. As long as the community has an internal dialogue about what damage they're willing to sustain to get what they want ..... and they actually know what damage they're doing .... eventually they'll sort it out.

Here, we have an internal social dialogue about how much alcohol we can enjoy before the damage outweighs the pleasure.  We have a dialogue about how much food we can consume before obesity diminishes our ability to enjoy life.  We have these negotiations because we all know someone who is an alcoholic and someone who is obese.  In a society where deathpaste is so common that people recognize the hazard through interpersonal experience... its eventually going to become self-regulating, one way or other.  

In a perfect world, we wouldn't do things that KNOW bring us harm, but I don't see us smartening up that much any time soon.  I try to concentrate on finding the situations where people don't know the consequences, (or do, and don't care) and the harm never stops.

jmk3482
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Re: Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you for all that information. The importance of your work is immeasurable and I know I can always count on you for informed insight. Thank you again, Catherine. :D

Maggie
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Re: Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

I cannot begin to tell you just how frustrated I am with the local Sudanese community! Argh! They are really lovely people, the first woman to henna me was from Sudan but dang they don't take the deathpaste issue seriously!!! I was at a festival last weekend and they asked if I did deathpaste, I said no and explained why and even brought out the pictures and then they said they'd mix it for me! I know we just have keep at it and putting out the message but one of these days...

CCartwrightJones
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Re: Sudan Henna Parlour slide show

Delayed hypersensitivity reactions and the 15% reaction rate (estimated by some) really kicks understanding into the ditch.  Compare that to: "I don't need to use condoms if if s/he looks healthy". There are some public health problems where denial flows particularly fast and deep, because of the nature of the problem.

EVENTUALLY people will "get it".  I think many deathpaste slingers are in denial because they really don't want to be confronted with the damage they're doing. That's tough to own ... the only good news on that is that at some point the reaction WILL HAPPEN TO THEM, and then they'll look back and think ... wow ... and still probably look for excuses.  Durn shame they have burn so many people on the way to enlightenment.

The deathpaste problem has many parallels to HIV in terms of public health management, and that'll be part of the diss.  Ever read "The Slow Plague"?  Very similar numbers in epidemic progression.

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